How could a man today fit the description of the L-rd’s righteous servant in the Book of Isaiah 52/14 with his visage or appearance marred and his form beyond human semblance. Here is one way, using the ideas of Judaism and Christianity for their descriptions of the righteous servant as Israel or Jesus.

If I were to be seen with all of my injuries from accidents and surgical operations at one time, before healing, together with my congenital disfigurement, my appearance would be marred and my form beyond human semblance. This is my history:

I was born premature in the seventh month without the muscles of my right breast and with a disfigured right shoulder and arm, which is thinner and weaker than my left arm. I would have a four-inch wound from surgery to remove tissue above the right breast when I was two years old. I was small and my parents were told I would not live to see the next day.

[……………..]

That is how a man could fit the description of the L-rd’s righteous servant in the Book of Isaiah 52/14 using the accepted ideas of Judaism and Christianity for describing Israel and Jesus, who did not covenant with G-d to offer themselves for guilt in return for long life and to see their children.

“For they shall see what has not been told them, Shall behold what they never have heard.”

That would be me, this piece and “My Midrash of Isaiah 53; Suffering Servant Jesus Christ, Suffering Servant Israel or G-d’s Righteous Servant Keith Ellis McCarty (Elijah)”, among many other writings posted here.

Keith Ellis McCarty, Esquire

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Just as the many were appalled at him—So marred was his appearance, unlike that of man, His form beyond human semblance—Just so he shall startle many nations. Kings shall be silenced because of him, For they shall see what has not been told them, Shall behold what they never have heard. Isaiah 52/14-15 Tanakh JPS 1985.

But the Lord chose to crush him by disease,That, if he made himself an offering for guilt, He might see offspring and have long life, And that through him the Lord’s purpose might prosper. Out of his anquish he shall see it; He shall enjoy it to the full through his devotion. Isaiah 53/10 Tanakh JPS 1985.

The Servant songs (also called the Servant poems or the Songs of the Suffering Servant) are songs in the Book of Isaiah. They were first identified by Bernhard Duhm in his 1892 commentary on Isaiah. The songs…

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