c

4For I had planned a day of vengeance, And My year of redemption arrived. 5Then I looked, but there was none to help; I stared, but there was none to aid—So My own arm wrought the triumph, And My own rage was My aid. 6I trampled peoples in My anger, I made them drunk with My rage, And I hurled their glory to the ground.” 7I will recount the kind acts of the Lord, The praises of the Lord—For all that the Lord has wrought for us, The vast bounty to the House of Israel That He bestowed upon them According to His mercy and His great kindness. 8He thought: Surely they are My people, Children who will not play false. So He was their Deliverer. 9In all their troubles He was troubled, And the angel of His Presence delivered them. In His love and pity He Himself redeemed them, Raised them, and exalted them All the days of old. 10But they rebelled, and grieved His holy spirit; Then He became their enemy, And Himself made war against them. 11Then they remembered the ancient days, Him, who pulled His people out [of the water]: “Where is He who brought them up from the Sea Along with the shepherd of His flock? Where is He who put In their midst His holy spirit,     Isaiah 63/4-11 Tanakh JPS 1985.

 

10But the Lord chose to crush him by disease,
That, if he made himself an offering for guilt,
He might see offspring and have long life,
And that through him the Lord’s purpose might prosper.     Isaiah 53/10 Tanakh JPS 1985.

 

1Behold, I am sending My messenger to clear the way before Me, and the Lord whom you seek shall come to His Temple suddenly. As for the angel of the covenant that you desire, he is already coming.     Malachi 3/1 Tanakh JPS 1985.

 

23Lo, I will send the prophet Elijah to you before the coming of the awesome, fearful day of the Lord. 24He shall reconcile parents with children and children with their parents, so that, when I come, I do not strike the whole land with utter destruction.
Lo, I will send the prophet Elijah to you before the coming of the awesome, fearful day of the Lord.     Malachi 3/23-24 Tanakh JPS 1985.

 

Holy Spirit in Judaism    (Excerpts) From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Holy Spirit (Hebrew: ‎רוּחַ הַקֹּדֶשׁ, Modern ruach hakodeshTiberian ruaħ haqqodɛʃ) in Judaism, also termed “Divine Inspiration,” generally refers to the inspiration through which attuned individuals perceive and channel the Divine through action, writing or speech. Through this they attain some degree of prophetic knowledge, and possibly convey it to others.[1][2][3]

The phrase ruach hakodesh (also transliterated ruaḥ ha-qodesh) is used in the Tanakh and other writings to refer either to the spirit of inspiration as above, or to the general, indwelling revelation of the Divine Presence among the Jews, also known as the Shekhinah. Although the term appears frequently in post-biblical writings, in Scripture itself, the term appears only in possessive form as רוּחַ קָדְשְׁךָ‎ ruach kadoshkham “Thy holy spirit” (Psalms 51:11), and as רוּחַ קָדְשׁוֹ ruach kadsho, “His holy spirit” (Isaiah 63:10,11). Later writings identify other scriptural instances of the word רוּחַ ruach, “spirit,” as indicating ruach hakodesh.[4][1]

In other contexts, Holy Spirit may refer to the divine force, quality, and influence of God over the universe or over His creatures.[5]

Prophecy:

“Holy Spirit” can indicate the general ability to perceive Divine revelations shared by all prophets. For example, Rabbi Moshe Chaim Luzzatto writes about the general return of prophecy in the Messianic Era using this term.[6] In the KuzariJudah Halevi corroborates that “Holy Spirit” indicates prophecy of various levels, and adds further that righteous leaders of the Jewish people such as kings and the High Priest of Israel are also granted the Holy Spirit to guide them.[4]

Holy Spirit can also be used more technically to indicate a specific level of inspiration. Among the various levels of prophecy, Holy Spirit is one of the lowest levels, and is strictly speaking not considered prophecy proper.[7] The difference lies in the intensity of the experience, and the lack of knowledge that the revelation is an actual prophecy.[8] According to Maimonides, a person experiencing this revelation would feel the spirit enter him and give him the power and motivation to speak. The subject could be of science, a psalm, a moral message for those around him, or an exposition of political or theological knowledge. This would occur while he was conscious and in the full possession of his senses,[9] though the revelation could also come in a dream.[8] Several books in Scripture such as the Psalms, Book of Daniel, and Book of Esther were written with this Holy Spirit, and their authors are thus only called prophets in the more general sense of the term.[10]

The above is different from true prophecy in a few ways. A proper prophet would have no doubt about his status as a prophet; he would know definitely without any uncertainty that his revelation was a true prophecy.[11] Also, while one with Holy Spirit would retain control over his body and senses, a prophet’s limbs would tremble, his physical powers would weaken, and he would lose control of his senses in order that his mind be able to focus entirely on the revelation.[12][13] (The sole exception to this is Moses, who retained his composure during prophecy.[14])

Talmud:

The term is discussed in the Babylonian TalmudMakkot 23b and elsewhere. Rabbinical use is discussed by Joseph Jacobs and Lajos Blau in the article “Holy Spirit” in the Jewish Encyclopedia of 1911.[21]

In Judaism, God is One; the idea of God as a duality or trinity is considered shituf (or “not purely monotheistic”). The term ruacḥ haQodesh is found frequently in Talmudic and Midrashic literature. In some cases it signifies prophetic inspiration, while in others it is used as a hypostatization or a metonym for God.[5] The rabbinical understanding of the Holy Spirit has a certain degree of personification, but it remains, “a quality belonging to God, one of his attributes”.[22]

In Rabbinic Judaism references to the spirit of God abound, however apart from certain strains of Kabbalistic mysticism it has rejected any idea of God as being either dualistic, tri-personal, or ontologically complex.

 

Commentary:

Chapter 63 of Isaiah is ten chapters after the description of G-d’s righteous servant who is identified for the prosperity of G-d’s purpose. A purpose not specified but a complete reading of Isaiah strongly indicates it is the end time redemption of the Jewish people. A purpose that  “might” prosper.

This means the man identified is Elijah of Malachi 3 who appears as a messenger with the angel of the covenant of sin forgiveness for a time to come G-d promised in Jeremiah 31. That begins the redemption and makes the Jewish people a holy seed to rebuild the Temple for G-d to return to quickly. If there was a temple G-d would not be returning to it He would be dwelling in it (as He was in the time of Jesus and John the Baptist).

And Elijah must reconcile the Jewish people to Judaism and the G-d of Israel (reconciling them one to the other). If not, G-d promises utter destruction to the land. That means His purpose of returning to His Temple which must be rebuilt might not prosper which ties Isaiah 53 to Malachi 3. It is also why Elijah is the man described in Isaiah 53.

“4For I had planned a day of vengeance, And My year of redemption arrived. 5Then I looked, but there was none to help; I stared, but there was none to aid— So My own arm wrought the triumph, And My own rage was My aid. 6I trampled peoples in My anger, I made them drunk with My rage, And I hurled their glory to the ground.”

Verse 4 would be the awesome, fearful day of the Lord of Malachi 3/23. Verses 5 and 6 is what happens if the Jewish people refuse to recognize Elijah and help him reconcile the Jewish people one to the other through Judaism and HaShem and utter destruction to the land occurs (no timetable on that given).

“9In all their troubles He was troubled, And the angel of His Presence delivered them. In His love and pity He Himself redeemed them, Raised them, and exalted them All the days of old. 10But they rebelled, and grieved His holy spirit; Then He became their enemy, And Himself made war against them.”

The angel of His Presence is the person of the spirit of the Holy G-d. And if His holy spirit can be grieved he also has to be a person. They are one and the same person.

The angel of His Presence is also the angel of the covenant of Malachi 3. I know this because the spirit of G-d that alights upon the twig of the stump of Jesse of Isaiah 11/2 includes the person of the spirit of G-d and he alighted upon me in 2007 and has been dwelling with me ever since that time. I am the twig, the servant described in Isaiah 53 who is Elijah and the prophet like Moses.

The person of the spirit of the holy G-d dwells with no other man. And where the angel of His Presence is so is HaShem.

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